"India being a front runner in the field of information technology, a product of Indian origin should be packaged with the best possible intuitive features in its guided user interface."

Automation is basically the delegation of human control functions to technical equipment aimed toward achieving higher productivity and energy efficiency. It is playing a vital role in reducing the human efforts and eliminates the manual errors.

While retrospecting the automation in hematology, we will be missing the wood for the tree, if we do not peep into the chronology in which automation in hematology has evolved over the years.

It was in 1950 the first cell counter, which works on electrical impedance principle came into existence, which revolutionized the way cell counting was done.

Today in the midst of many variant technologies available around us, when we look back, those initial designs may be looked down as pre-historic or Jurassic.

In the 1970s, automated 3 -part differential leukocyte counters (lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes) entered the market, which emerged as a viable alternative to manual WBC counting.

In 1980, an instrument that could churn out 10 parameter complete blood count (CBC) was developed.

The 1990 brought further advancements in WBC differentials with the use of flow-cell techniques based on either electrical impedance or light scatter properties. Eventually, this process was upgraded even further when it became possible to obtain these results without uncapping the sample.

The three main technologies used in today's hematology analyzers are: electrical impedance, flow cytometry, and fluorescent flow cytometry. These are used in combination with chemical reagents that lyse or alter blood cells to extend the measurable parameters.

Manufacturers combine these three technologies with innovative uses of reagents, hydrofluidics, and data analysis tools to produce proprietary methods, each of which has strength in terms of accuracy, speed, or breadth of parameters.

Automation has gone to the next level wherein some model can determine nucleated red blood cell (NRBC), reticulocyte count (RET), immature retic fraction (IRF), and automated immature platelet fraction (IPF).

The latest in the series can automate the process of smear preparation and staining.

Hematology analyzers have high level of precision over the manual technology. It eliminates the statistical error associated with the manual counting. The turnaround time (TAT) is the key benefit of hematology automation where in a lab is able to produce quick quality results.

Being a vibrant technology company, we always look to harness our resources, to design and develop affordable technologies and innovative products.

India being a front runner in the field of information technology, a product of Indian origin should be packaged with the best possible intuitive features in its guided user interface.

We join our nation's endeavor to reduce the over dependence on import of technologies in the field of medical electronics and help nation building by saving our foreign exchange reserves.


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